September Down Month

This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  galvestonian1 2 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #19757

    Bruin79

    What do you all think about next month in September since it’s a month that is historically all three indices takes a turn downward, I’m thinking about transferring into the G fund for a good part of September, especially now there is talk on CNBC from a Mr. Dudley of a possible rate hike, which make the markets go down like last year’s talk of Feds raising rates month after month, which kept the markets on edge on a roller coaster ride.

    #19762

    Anne
    Participant

    If your looking for safety, I think F may be a better bet. In election years, the stock market generally does well in August & September. Some analyst think we could breakout to over 2300 but I have no clue. Sometimes it may be better to flip a coin to decide. TS Paul believes in keeping it in the best fund based on economic cycle but as always it is up to you.

    #19764

    galvestonian1
    Participant

    I never try to time the market like that. But some have had success with it. For me the best option is staying in it for the long haul. I’ve been 60% S and 40% C for a long time and have done quite well. My TSP was down a bunch following Brexit, but it’s all come back and then some. I used to be of the mindset that I would move to a safe haven once I got close to retirement, but no more. Doing so would leave huge gains on the table. I still have about 8 years before I retire, but the only change I will make with investing will be to stash away a few years of “INCOME” money that I’ll need to supplement my retirement pension and SS. Other than that, the bulk of my TSP will be left in higher risk, higher return funds for “GROWTH.” One thing I am considering upon retirement is a move from the TSP to my Vanguard account. I know a lot of people say you can’t match the TSP’s expense ratios, but Vanguard has some pretty good expense ratios if you choose the right funds. A good example is Vanguard’s VFIAX which has an expense ratio of 0.05%. Not a huge difference when you consider the numerous added options versus the TSP. My Vanguard traditional IRA has earned 11.3% over its 3-year life, and I have it all invested in the VFIAX, (Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Class).

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